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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Ball's Battle



Source

On July 30, 1813, when General Harrison sent Colonel Wells to relieve Major Croghan from command at Fort Stephenson, he was escorted from Fort Seneca by Colonel Ball's squadron, consisting of about 100 horse.

On the way down they fell in with a body of Indians and fought what has since been called Ball's Battle.




Tuesday, July 29, 2014

General Wade Hampton


Wade Hampton III in the Civil War - Grandson Of War of 1812 General
South Carolina Confederate Military Museum


Wade Hampton was a type of the large slaveholders of the South. Nearly sixty years of age, self-important, fiery and over indulgent in drink, of large, imposing figure, of some reputed service in the Revolution, and with a record as Congressman and Presidential elector, he was one whose chief virtues were not patience and humility. In 1809 he had been made a brigadier-general and stationed at New Orleans; but in consequence of continual disagreements with his subordinates, was superseded in 1812 by Wilkinson, whom he consequently hated. In the spring of 1813 he received his Major-General's commission. Source


Monday, July 28, 2014

Brock's Glorious Words


Source

'"We are engaged in an awful and eventful contest. By unanimity and despatch in our councils and by vigour in our iterations, we will teach the enemy this lesson; that a country defended by free men, enthusiastically devoted to the cause of their King and constitution, can never be conquered."'

"It was with these glorious and inspiring words that Major-General Brock, then Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of  Upper Canada, concluded the speech with which on the 27th July, 1812, he opened the extra session of the Legislature of the Province, which he had summoned immediately following the declaration of war by the United States on the 18th of June."

Major-General Sir Isaac Brock was born 6th October, 1769; died 13th October, 1812, by J. A. Macdonell, K.C., Glengarry. 


Sunday, July 27, 2014

Battle Of Burnt Corn



Source

"The first definite act of armed warfare between the inhabitants of the Mississippi Territory and the Creek Nation was the battle of Burnt Corn on July 27, 1813.  The Creeks, numbering about 300 picked warriors, had gathered in camp at the Holy Ground according to information given out by General James Wilkinson, who was soon to leave for his new post in Canada."

The Battle of Burnt Corn has its own Facebook site and is on YouTube.